All You Need To Know About Summer Youth Olympic Games-2018!

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The third edition of the Youth Olympic Games begins today.  The first event was held in 2010 with an aim to provide opportunities to young athletes and to engage communities across world through Olympic values. The idea was developed by Austrian Industrialist Johann Rosenzopf due to his concern about the rising numbers of global childhood obesity and the decreases sport activity level in youth. He also conceived that the event would serve as a pathway to the Olympic Games. The previous two summer events have been held in Singapore (2010) and Nanjing, China (2014).

Google dedicated a doodle on October 6 for this event and it went viral.

More about the 2018 event

  • The 2018 Summer Youth Olympics Games (YOG), officially known as the III Summer Youth Olympic Games will be hosted in Buenos Aires, Argentina this year from October 6 to October 18.
  • A total of 1,600 participants of age group 15 to 18 from more than 200 countries will compete in the games at different events.
  • The mascot for this year is native to Argentina ‘Pandi – a teen jaguar’.
  • Lionel Messi, Argentinian footballer and Olympic gold medalist, is the ambassador of the 2018 YOG.
  • Which new sports will be featured?

Four new sports will make their debut in the Argentine capital: dancesport, karate, roller speed skating and sport climbing.

India at the Youth Olympics

 India has managed to win a total of 10 medals so far (7 silver and 3 bronze). This year 47 athletes from India will participate in a total of 13 sports (37 disciplines) namely Archery, Athletics, Badminton, Boxing, Field hockey, Judo, Rowing, Shooting, Sport climbing, Swimming, Table tennis, Weightlifting and Wrestling.

Hopefully, India will bring their first gold medal home. Some of the popular names of participants from India include Commonwealth Games medallist shooter Mehuli Ghosh, junior world cup champion Manu Bhaker, world youth boxing champion Jyoti Gulia and world youth silver medalist Jeremy Lalrinunga in weightlifting.